Programs

Research and Presentations


IFCK Baltimore is uniquely situated in the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy, a CDC funded center of excellence in injury control and is administered as a collaborative program of the Johns Hopkins Child Injury Prevention Network (JHCIPN). JHCIPN is a collaborative group of faculty and staff from the Center for Injury Research and Policy (JHCIRP) at the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Pediatric Emergency Department and Pediatric Trauma and Burn Program at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center (JHCC). Our tripartite mission is to advance research and its application to reduce the burden of injuries among children; bring evidence-based services and programs to the patients and families of the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, the Harriet Lane Clinic and the Baltimore community; and educate families and providers on how to best reduce the risk of injury through injury prevention services, including consultations, community outreach, referrals, resources and safety products. Our current research projects and educational and service programs are described in more detail below.

Baltimore Directors


Contact Info

Eileen M. McDonald


Mapping address: 624 N. Broadway, Baltimore, MD



Description

The Between Riding and Driving Program educates youth about factors which increase their risk of injury or death when they ride in motor vehicles. The program educates youth (10 – 15 yr olds) about the Maryland laws on restraint use, cell phones/distracted driving, alcohol use, and graduated licensing.

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Description

The Johns Hopkins Injury Prevention Teams hosts biannual Car Seat Inspections open to the community, patients and families. Car seat technicians are on hand to check for recalls, ensure car seats are optimal for the child’s age and body size and check harness fit and proper installation. The IP Coordinator collaborates with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Kids in Safety Seats Program, to ensure senior checkers are on hand to confirm installation met state standards.

Contact Information



Description

In recognition of April's National Distracted Driving Awareness Month, Hopkins Adult and Pediatric Trauma Centers, hold a Distracted Driving Prevention Awareness Seminar and Health Fair. Distracted driving continues to be a dangerous, escalating problem on Maryland’s roadways. The event features information on distracted driving crash data, evidence-based prevention programs, and policy implementation and successes. Attendees have the opportunity to try a distracted driving virtual reality experience.

Contact Information



Description

In-patient Injury Prevention Consult Program provides health education and counseling to Children’s Center patients who present with a high injury risk as identified by a member of the clinical team. Safety topics include: home safety, fire safety, water safety, car seat safety, falls prevention and more. In addition, the IP Team implements age appropriate safety activities and games with patients on the units to increase safety knowledge and safe behaviors. On occasion, the IP Team leads interactive safety demonstrations in the waiting rooms of the ED and Outpatient clinics.

Contact Information



Description

PENDING

Contact Information

Eileen M. McDonald
emcona1@jhu.edu
(410) 614-0225

Amanda Davani
adavani2@jhu.edu



Description

The Johns Hopkins Mobile Safety Center is a 40-foot mobile injury prevention resource center that travels throughout Baltimore City educating children, adults and older adults about household and road traffic safety. Visit our website for more details.

Contact Information



Description

The Pediatric Trauma Service runs a monthly trauma research meeting to disseminate research findings and to explore and promote collaborations across the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions on a way array of pediatric trauma care, injury prevention and other pediatric issues.

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Description

The Johns Hopkins Children’s Safety Center is the longest running safety resource center in the United States, established in 1997. Visit our website for more details.

Contact Information



Description

Snow Injury Tip Sheet

The recommendation from Johns Hopkins Hospital, the level 1 trauma center for the state of Maryland Play but play safely!

- According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission in the year 2000, thousands of injuries were treated in hospitals, doctors' offices, ambulatory surgery centers, clinics and costs billions of dollars in medical bills and lost income.

- As a trauma center, we care for the most severe kids, and many of the children we have treated have had major head injuries – ranging from skull fractures to brain bleeds. Esp. true for our older kids!

- Approximately 40 injuries seen by JHH trauma service over the last 5 years

- Sledding may cause head injuries in young children, while older children and adults have more extremity injuries. Other injuries can include contusions, abrasions and abdominal injuries, musculoskelatal injuries

- Parental supervision is key.

Be Smart!

- Warm up properly – spend a few minutes stretching your hamstrings, thigh muscles, hips and calves before and after any strenuous activity

- Make sure your child's clothes stay dry. If they become wet, change your child into a dry clothes.

- Wear adequate clothing, preferably in layers. Don’t forget good quality sunglasses, goggles and sunscreen.

- Recognize when you need a rest

- Never consume alcohol or other mood altering drugs

- Never, ever, play on the back of a moving vehicle

Know your equipment!

- Wear a protective helmet. While some may consider them “uncool” there is nothing cool about sustaining a head injury. Ideally, any helmet should comply with one of the American standards (Snell RS98 or ASTM F2040) or the European standard EN1077. This indicates that it has passed certain standards

- Have your own equipment checked regularly

- Longer skis are more difficult to turn and bindings set too high for your ability are more likely to cause injury

- Boots should fit snugly without your ankle moving around inside

- Follow manufacturer guidelines regarding the number of people on a sled

Know your abilities!

- Don’t be tempted to skip professional instruction - injuries are common in beginners

- Ski or snowboard with a friend (Always stay in sight of each other in case of an emergency. The ideal number of people to ski with is three, one to stay with the injured person and one to go for help)

- If you are tired, rest (most injuries occur towards the end of the day)

- Know your limitations. Match the difficulty of the run to your abilities

- Children can lose control of their sleds and hit a tree or another object, or even another child. After falling off of a sled, additional injuries can occur when a child's body suddenly hits the snow.

Know your environment! - Sledding on or into the roadway should be prohibited. Look for shallow slopes that are free of obstacles such as trees and fences, many children sled into street and get hit by a car

- Be aware of snow conditions. Get the weather report

- Sled in designated areas that are free from trees and other immobile objects

- Avoid sledding on icy surfaces.

- Never sleigh near or in crowded areas, children often cannot steer the sled.

Contact Information



Description

PI, I. Nasir

This PTS-based research project is evaluating the long term impact of a bicycle safety education and bike helmet distribution program that is free of charge, delivered within an urban hospital Children’s Center, with specific attention to changes in youths’ bicycle safety knowledge, attitudes about bicycle safety, and helmet wearing behaviors.

Contact Information



Description

PI, L. Ryan

The overall goal of our project is to create and pilot test a culturally relevant video that demonstrates proper bicycle helmet fitting and promotes bicycle helmet use for children and adolescents in Baltimore City that can be implemented in the primary care setting. We hypothesize that this video will improve knowledge of bicycle helmet safety and use of helmets in at-risk urban families and patients.

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New Program

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Eileen M. McDonald, MS

Photograph of Eileen

Job Title:
Associate Scientist and Director, Johns Hopkins Children's Safety Centers

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Contact Information

Email Address:
emcdona1@jhu.edu

Phone Number:
(410) 614-0225`

Mailing Address:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
624 N. Broadway, Room 731
Baltimore, MD 21205


Lauren Malloy, MSW, CPST

[photograph here]

Job Title:
IFCK Co-Project Coordinator and Lead Injury Prevention Coordinator

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Email Address:
ldavis87@jhmi.edu

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Amanda Davani

[photograph here]

Job Title:
IFCK Co-Project Coordinator and Senior Research Coordinator, CIRP

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Contact Information

Email Address:
adavani2@jhu.edu

Phone Number:
410-614-9191

Mailing Address:
624 N. Broadway, Hampton House 597


Beatrice Brathwaite

[photograph here]

Job Title:
Community Outreach Specialist, Pediatric Trauma Service

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Email Address:
bnettle2@jhmi.edu

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Rosemary Acosta Wright, BS

[photograph here]

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Community Outreach Specialist

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Email Address:
rwrigh57@jhmi.edu

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New Person

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